The CHTL is now on Twitter!

CHTLfbThe Center for History Teaching and Learning is pleased to announce the launching of its new Twitter account.  The Center will be tweeting out information concerning upcoming events and all things related to history education.

Follow us at @utepchtl and help us to continue building a vibrant community dedicated to history teaching and learning!

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High School Social Studies Curriculum for Mexican American Studies

Please see the link below for high school social studies curriculum.

This site is provided by the MAS Program at the University of Texas-Pan American. It will serve as a clearing house for MAS curriculum and resources as well.

www.utpa.edu/mas-curriculum

New Hours and Face for Fall

We are pleased to announce a new face and new operating hours in the Center for fall 2013. Joseph Leff is a student in UTEP’s MA program. Stop by the Center’s Resource Room to check out a textbook, prepare for certification exams, or get advice.

Welcome Joseph!

 

Fall 2013: Monday By appointment
Tuesday 12:30-4:30 p.m.
Wednesday 9:00 a.m.-2:00 p.m.
Thursday By appointment
Friday 1:00-5:00 p.m.
Saturday Closed
Sunday Closed

Resource of the Week: Civil War Communities

Resource:       The Valley of the Shadow: Two Communities in the American Civil War

Provider:        Virginia Center for Digital History and University of Virginia Library

URL:                  http://valley.lib.virginia.edu/

Review by:       Jessica Perea

 

The Valley of the Shadow website allows the reader to locate and read stories of families during the Civil War era. These families are from the Southern communities and the Northern communities. There are various correspondence, diaries, newspapers, church records, and speeches. These methods of communication of the past seemed to have mostly originated in Augusta County, Virginia and Franklin County, Pennsylvania. Upon entering the archive, the site visitor has three options to choose from, the eve of the war, the war years, and the aftermath. Each topic is set up in a diagram with subtopics. I clicked on the middle diagram (the war years) and selected the images tab. Here, you can limit your search to a particular battlefield, place, even the name of a soldier. I left all fields blank and hit the search button. There were 774 records in total. On the first page there were soldiers. Alongside these photos was information about them, including their regiment. In the last section, the aftermath, there was a section honoring the memory of those who fought, Memory of the War. Along with the memory, there was a section dedicated to the Freedmen’s Bureau.

See our Archive of Past Resources of the Week.

 

Reviews of teaching resources are for informational purposes only and do not imply endorsement by the Center for History Teaching & Learning, the UTEP History Department, or the University of Texas at El Paso. Reviews are published during the academic year.

Resource of the Week: Primary Documents in U.S. Hist.

Resource:       Primary Documents in American History

Provider:        Kenneth Drexler and Mark F. Hall, Digital Reference Specialists

URL:                  http://www.loc.gov/rr/program/bib/ourdocs/PrimDocsHome.html

 

Review by:      Tiena Candia

This virtual library provides access to a compilation of documents from the Library of Congress. The site focuses on providing primary source documents in American History between the years 1763-1877. This time frame marks some of the most important events in early United States history beginning with the American Revolution up to the Reconstruction. Each link serves as a portal to thousands of documents, including numerous historical collections and exhibitions. The exhibitions contain pictures of the actual sources, such as the Declaration of Independence and the Treaty or Paris, as well as artist interpretations of significant historical events. The website is updated frequently and even includes a number of relevant documents from the 20th century. In addition, there is a link to the Library of Congress website which contains access to additional sources as well as other helpful websites.

See our Archive of Past Resources of the Week.

 

Reviews of teaching resources are for informational purposes only and do not imply endorsement by the Center for History Teaching & Learning, the UTEP History Department, or the University of Texas at El Paso. Reviews are published during the academic year.

Resource of the Week: Investigating U.S. History

Resource:       Investigating U.S. History

Provider:        The City University of New York

URL:                 http://investigatinghistory.ashp.cuny.edu/

Review by:      Amanda Gutierrez

Investigating U.S. History was a project funded by a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities, and from the Chancellor’s Office of the City University of New York (CUNY). This website began as a collaborative project among faculty members from all across City University of New York campuses. Faculty members from CUNY made a joint effort in developing and testing interactive multimedia learning modules for introductory college U.S. history survey courses. Investigating U.S. History features a wide variety of material for the educators to access lesson modules, instructional guidelines, archival resources, as well as, primary and secondary sources. In addition, this teaching resource website includes twelve multimedia modules, which were effectively tested and put into practice in over thirty history classrooms throughout the City University of New York. The content of these twelve multimedia modules features interesting lesson plans ranging from the 18th century colonies of Virginia and Chesapeake to the political climate and issues surrounding the 1960s.

Each lesson module is broken down for the educator to access by providing a general overview of the lesson, followed by the background information, and a detailed and structured outline of the lesson plan. Multimedia modules in this website feature different interactive media, writing exercises, historical resources and archives, and access to a variety of primary and secondary for both students and teachers. Many of the activities featured in each of the modules gives students tools to interrogate evidence from a variety of sources, find historical evidence to support an argument, and how critically examine different historical perspectives.

The classroom exercises and instructional activities also offer helpful instructor’s annotations to guide the educator on the main objectives for the classroom reading exercises, classroom discussions and debates, and overall organization of the lesson plan. This is a great feature because it helps the teacher with an organized methodology to help students develop their historical thinking skills, reading, and writing. This website also develops scaffolding for student learning that allows student to deconstruct provisional questions for historical inquiry and analysis, to challenge new sources with evidence, and learn the process of historical reasoning.

See our Archive of Past Resources of the Week.

Reviews of teaching resources are for informational purposes only and do not imply endorsement by the Center for History Teaching & Learning, the UTEP History Department, or the University of Texas at El Paso. Reviews are published during the academic year.

Resource of the Week: National Jukebox

Resource:       National Jukebox
Provider:        The Library of Congress
URL:                http://www.loc.gov/jukebox/

Review by:     Review by: Matthew Akers

The National Jukebox presents a collection of over 10,000 historical acoustical recordings, made between 1901 and 1925 (when electrical recording began becoming the norm). The National Jukebox features a database broken down into many subcategories, like: vocal, language, place, target audience, label, date range, composer, author, lyricist, performer, and genre. Also featured is the Jukebox Day by Day, a page in which you can search recordings by the day and month they were recorded, and the Playlist of Recordings, a list of compilations that feature backing soundtracks to different cultural events like the Civil War, ragtime, Black Broadway, and Tin Pan Alley. Also included is an interactive edition of the 1919 Victoria Book of the Opera, which includes descriptions and plot synopses of more than 110 popular operas of the day and a list of recordings made available for purchase in 1919. All in all, it is an interesting concept, but very focused in its scope.

See our Archive of Past Resources of the Week.

Reviews of teaching resources are for informational purposes only and do not imply endorsement by the Center for History Teaching & Learning, the UTEP History Department, or the University of Texas at El Paso. Reviews are published during the academic year.

Center Begins New “Resource of the Week” Program

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
November 2, 2011


El Paso, Texas – The Center for History Teaching & Learning is pleased to announce a new program of publishing weekly reviews of online resources for history and social studies teachers. The Center aims to identify and share the best digital resources for use in twenty-first-century classrooms.

Reviews will be published weekly on the Center’s blog and Facebook page. The blog already contains reviews of a nationwide clearinghouse of lessons plans and best practices, an online museum of presidential campaign commercials, a database of trans-Atlantic slave voyages, an online repository of primary source documents from around the world, and a summary of resources in the El Paso Historical Society.

Facebook users may connect by “liking” the Center’s page; visitors to the blog may subscribe by email or RSS feed.

The Center for History Teaching & Learning is a division of UTEP’s History Department created to promote scholarly teaching among department faculty, support teacher education among our students, and provide outreach and professional development opportunities for area social studies teachers.

For more information, please visit utep.edu/chtl, send an email to chtl@utep.edu, or call 915-747-5878.

LINKS

Archive of past resources https://utepchtl.wordpress.com/category/resource-of-the-week/

Blog https://utepchtl.wordpress.com/

Facebook http://www.facebook.com/utepchtl

Resource of the Week: National Hist. Educ. Clearinghouse

Resource:      National History Education Clearinghouse

URL:                  http://teachinghistory.org/

 

Review by:    Amanda Gutierrez

Teachinghistory.org is a website funded by the U.S. Department of Education designed to help K-12 history educators’ access historical materials and online resources to enhance education in U.S. history classrooms. Teachinghistory.org includes a wide array of teaching materials, lesson plan reviews, and teaching guidelines and methods to effectively incorporate in the classroom setting. Many of the lesson plan reviews in this website explore historical events such as the different perspectives on what really happened on the first Thanksgiving, and analyzing historical photographs from the Civil War. This website also features multiple sources, as well as web links to the Library of Congress and other access to other historical online archives for the educator.

A unique feature incorporated in Teachinghistory.org is the different icons displayed on the main webpage where the user can icons such as, ask a historian, ask a master teacher, and ask a digital historian. For example, under the icon Ask a Historian, a question regarding the historical topic is provided, along with a full-length response from a historian who thoroughly investigated the historical topic or issue. This aspect of the website is both useful and fascinating because it provides a historical account and supplemental resource for the educator to use in the classroom. Under the icon titled Teaching Guide, other social studies educators present innovative ways to develop student’s historical and technical writing, critical reading skills, and developing historical thinking. Teachinghistory.org further offers suggestions for teachers to help students develop their historical thinking skills by featuring activities for teachers to do history in the classroom. For example, teaching historical ephemera and timelines are just a few ways for educators to enhance their history classrooms. This website is both innovative and well organized in fusing the historical content, analytic thinking, and scaffolding in U.S. history classrooms.

 

See our Archive of Past Resources of the Week.

 

Reviews of teaching resources are for informational purposes only and do not imply endorsement by the Center for History Teaching & Learning, the UTEP History Department, or the University of Texas at El Paso. Reviews are published during the academic year.

Resource of the Week: Living Room Candidate

Resource:       Living Room Candidate

Provider:        Museum of the Moving Image

URL:                  http://www.livingroomcandidate.org

Review by:    Matthew Akers

The Living Room Candidate features a collection more than 300 presidential campaign commercials, spanning from the first presidential appearance on the television screen of Ike in 1952 to the present. The collection is broken down into categories such as: election year, type of ad, and issue. Each broad heading dives further into more specific areas of interest. The Living Room Candidate also includes links to online resources for further research in related fields, like the 2008 presidential election (candidate websites, websites about the campaigns, and blogs), political commercials (funders, makers, targets, analysis, a history of, and bibliographies), politics in general (presidential history and political campaigns), and previous presidential election websites (’96, ’00, ’04). As an added bonus for educators, there are eight pre-made lesson plans, an interactive feature called AdMaker, in which you can re-edit and make your own presidential ads, and links to more online lesson plans. This website is expansive and covers many aspects of its scope.

See our Archive of Past Resources of the Week.

Reviews of teaching resources are for informational purposes only and do not imply endorsement by the Center for History Teaching & Learning, the UTEP History Department, or the University of Texas at El Paso. Reviews are published during the academic year.