Historian Discusses American Foreign Policy

Historian and former Navy serviceman Dr. George C. Herring discussed more than 200 years of American foreign policy for a packed house at UTEP on Monday night. Looking at the dramatic story of America’s emergence as a superpower, from the American Revolution to the fifty-year struggle with communism and conflicts in Afghanistan and Iraq, Herring pointed out enduring themes as well as subtle ironies. Americans have always been engaged in diplomacy and always taken a sense of destiny into the international arena. Herring pointed out both triumphs and blunders as Americans worked to secure their place in the world from the seventeenth to the twenty-first century.

Herring_01The public lecture kicked off a four-day professional development event for social studies teachers that is co-sponsored by Humanities Texas and UTEP’s Center for History Teaching & Learning. Herring is a specialist in the history of U.S. foreign relations and has received National Endowment for the Humanities, Fulbright, and Guggenheim fellowships. His book, From Colony to Superpower, was published in 2008 in Oxford University Press’s prestigious History of the United States Series and was a finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award in non-fiction.

Free Lecture on American Foreign Policy

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U.S. Foreign Policy: From Colony to Superpower
By George C. Herring
Monday, June 17, 2013
5:30 PM
El Paso Natural Gas Conference Center, UTEP Campus

From the American Revolution to the fifty-year struggle with communism and conflicts in Afghanistan and Iraq, From Colony to Superpower tells the dramatic story of America’s emergence as superpower–its birth in revolution, its troubled present, and its uncertain future. The book was published in 2008 in Oxford University Press’s prestigious History of the United States Series. It was a finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award in non-fiction.

George C. Herring received a B.A. degree from Roanoke College and after service in the U.S. Navy earned M.A. and Ph.D. degrees from the University of Virginia. He is a specialist in the history of U.S. foreign relations and has received National Endowment for the Humanities, Fulbright, and Guggenheim fellowships. In October 2004, he was a resident at the Rockefeller Study Center in Bellagio, Italy. He has been a visiting professor at the University of Otago in New Zealand, the U.S. Military Academy at West Point, and the University of Richmond.

Parking on the UTEP campus is free and open to the public after 5:30 PM. Park in Lot S-3 on Sun Bowl Dr. Walk over the bridge. Follow the sidewalk to the conference center.

The Center for History Teaching & Learning is a division of UTEP’s History Department created to promote scholarly teaching among department faculty, support teacher education among our students, and provide outreach and professional development opportunities for area social studies teachers.

Print out your own poster.

For more information about the workshop, please visit www.utep.edu/chtl or contact Dr. Keith A. Erekson at 915-747-5878 or kaerekson@utep.edu.

Free Lecture on “How the Rich Got Rich”

How the Rich Got Rich: The Gilded Age in America”
By H. W. Brands
Tuesday, June 14, 2011
6:00 PM
UGLC 116, UTEP Campus

The decades after the Civil War saw the birth of modern American capitalism. American industry boomed, and with it the fortunes of those who mastered the corporate and financial techniques on which it was based. Ordinary Americans benefited as well, though not so spectacularly and not without wondering whether wealth alone was the true measure of a republic.

Dr. H. W. Brands is the Dickson Allen Anderson Centennial Professor of History at the University of Texas at Austin and the author of numerous books on a variety of historical topics. His biography of Benjamin Franklin, The First American (2000), and his biography of Franklin Roosevelt, Traitor to His Class (2008), were finalists for the Pulitzer Prize.

Enter campus via Mesa St. (east campus entrance). Due to construction, access to campus via University Ave. (west campus entrance) may not be available. Limited parking on the UTEP campus is free and open to the public after 5:30 PM.

The Center for History Teaching & Learning is a division of UTEP’s History Department created to promote scholarly teaching among department faculty, support teacher education among our students, and provide outreach and professional development opportunities for area social studies teachers.

Print out your own poster.

For more information about the workshop, please visit www.utep.edu/chtl or contact Dr. Keith A. Erekson at 915-747-5878 or kaerekson@utep.edu.

“Empire of Liberty”

Dr. Gordon S. Wood Presenter: Dr. Gordon S. Wood, Alva O. Way University Professor and Professor of History Emeritus at Brown University and Pulitzer Prize-winning author of numerous books including The Radicalism of the American Revolution and Empire of LibertyDate: Tuesday, June 8, 2010

Time: 6:00 p.m. book signing, 6:30-7:30 p.m. lecture

Location: Undergraduate Learning Center, Room 128, UTEP Campus (building #25 on this map)

Description: Download a Poster