Teaching History and Geography for the 21st Century through Digital Maps

Digital Maps

This half-day workshop designed by high school educators for high school educators introduces the concepts and theory of digital humanities. Teachers attending the one-day workshop will learn about how to utilize digital humanities sites to teach themes in geography and history through an exploration of the borderlands of the United States and Mexico, as well as the idea and concept of borders throughout the world.

Teachers attending the day long workshop will receive a USB drive containing:

  • Four week-long lesson plans utilizing digital maps
  • A detailed description explaining the humanities concepts covered by each lesson plan
  • A copy of Mills Kelly’s Teaching History in the Digital Age
  • A guide to Digital Humanities websites

Those who are interested in learning more about the project can contact Brad Cartwright at bjcartwright@utep.edu, 915-747-5878.

The workshop series is funded by Humanities Texas in partnership with UTEP’s Center for History Teaching and Learning and MapStory. For more information contact Brad Cartwright @ bjcartwright@utep.edu.

 

History Teachers Study with Experts

Fifty high school history and social studies teachers from the El Paso area and from around the state of Texas gathered at UTEP for three days of intensive training with leading scholars of American war and foreign policy. The teachers were selected from more than 500 applicants to attend this one of four sessions of the institute, titled “America at War in the Twentieth Century.”

Each morning, teachers attend dynamic lectures and presentations on topics ranging from the Spanish American War, to the turning points of World War II, to the Cuban Missile Crisis by UTEP historians Brad Cartwright, Maceo C. Dailey Jr., David Hackett and Jeffrey P. Shepherd. The institute faculty also includes George C. Herring of the University of Kentucky, Senate Historian Emeritus Richard A. Baker, and Maggie Rivas-Rodriguez and Mark Lawrence of The University of Texas at Austin.

Lectures

In the afternoons, participants join the faculty in small workshops to examine primary sources such as historic letters, maps and photographs. In this setting, teachers can ask questions, make connections, and discuss ways to engage their students in the study of history. During lunch on Tuesday, Keith Erekson shared plans for UTEP’s upcoming Centennial Celebration and outlined the “Top 6 Reasons Why Students Should Come to UTEP.” On Wednesday, Adair Margo, founder of the Tom Lea Institute, will give a lunchtime presentation on the Lea’s work as an artist-correspondent for Life Magazine in the Pacific theatre of World War II.

Workshops_02About two-thirds of the participating teachers are from the El Paso region and approximately half are UTEP alumni. “The faculty members have told me how impressed they have been by the engagement and the focused questions asked by the teacher participants,” said Dr. Eric Lupfer, Director of Grants and Education at Humanities Texas.

The summer institute is sponsored by Humanities Texas and UTEP’s Center for History Teaching & Learning. “America at War in the Twentieth Century” is made possible with funding from the State of Texas as well as from the National Endowment for the Humanities We the People initiative.

For more information about Humanities Texas, visit www.humanitiestexas.org. For information about The University of Texas at El Paso, visit www.utep.edu.

Humanities Texas and UTEP to Hold Teacher Institute on American Wars

June 14, 2013
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
CONTACT: Michael L. Gillette at (512) 440-1991

From June 17–20, 2013, more than fifty Texas teachers will attend a professional development institute sponsored by Humanities Texas and The University of Texas at El Paso (UTEP) examining twentieth-century American wars.

The institute, titled “America at War in the Twentieth Century,” offers teachers the opportunity to work closely with leading scholars, studying American participation in World Wars I and II and the wars in Korea and Vietnam.

Each morning, participants will attend dynamic lectures and presentations. In the afternoons, they will join faculty in small workshops to examine primary sources such as historic letters, maps and photographs.

The El Paso institute faculty includes George C. Herring of the University of Kentucky, Senate Historian Emeritus Richard A. Baker, and Maggie Rivas-Rodriguez and Mark Lawrence of The University of Texas at Austin.

UTEP historians Brad Cartwright, Maceo C. Dailey Jr., David Hackett and Jeffrey P. Shepherd will also serve on the institute faculty.

Adair Margo, founder of the Tom Lea Institute, will give a lunchtime presentation on the Lea’s work as an artist-correspondent for Life Magazine in the Pacific theatre of World War II.

“Humanities Texas is dedicated to improving the quality of classroom teaching throughout the state,” said Executive Director Michael L. Gillette. “Bringing teachers together to learn from leading scholars and from each other is an effective way to enable Texas students to receive the best possible educational opportunities.”

“America at War in the Twentieth Century” is made possible with funding from the State of Texas as well as from the National Endowment for the Humanities We the People initiative.

The El Paso program is the eighty-second professional development program for Texas classroom teachers organized by Humanities Texas. It is one of four institutes taking place in June at major universities across Texas. Other host universities include The University of Texas at Austin, The University of Texas at San Antonio and the University of Houston.

Humanities Texas, the state affiliate of the National Endowment for the Humanities, sponsors programs promoting heritage, culture and education throughout the state.

For more information about Humanities Texas, visit www.humanitiestexas.org. For information about The University of Texas at El Paso, visit www.utep.edu.

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1410 Rio Grande Street
Austin, Texas 78701
(512) 440-1991
www.humanitiestexas.org

Free Workshop on “Decoding” History


In “Decoding History,” Dr. Pace will lead participants through the process he has developed to help teachers identify the “bottlenecks” that occur when key assumptions about history remain hidden in invisible disciplinary “code.” He will introduce the decoding process and share videos of faculty working to define the often unstated processes that students must master to succeed in history. After seeing examples of successful strategies for decoding history, participants will have the opportunity to reflect on what remains “untaught” in their own classrooms.

“Decoding History”
A workshop with historian David Pace

Wednesday, June 13, 2012
9:00-10:30 am

Health Sciences & Nursing Building, Room 135
(Building #255 on this map)
The University of Texas at El Paso

Come prepared: read the article and visit the History Learning Project website

David Pace, Ph.D., is a Professor Emeritus of History at Indiana University and co-author of Decoding the Disciplines: Helping Students Learn Disciplinary Ways of Thinking (2004). He is a Fellow in the Carnegie Academy for the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning and a recipient of the American Historical Association’s Eugene Asher Distinguished Teaching Award. Over the past six years he has been one of the directors of the History Learning Project, which seeks to define the kinds of operations required of students in college-level history courses and to devise effective strategies.

A native of Houston, Dr. Pace specializes in modern European and cultural history and has authored scholarly studies on influential French anthropologist Claude Lévi-Strauss and on French reactions to the atomic bomb and nuclear energy. He has also developed a number of innovative history courses, including one on “Visions of the Future” and one on “Paris and Berlin in the 1920s” (a version of which he taught in Paris). For more than a decade he served as co-director of Indiana University’s Freshman Learning Project, a program that helps faculty across campus develop new ways of overcoming bottlenecks in to learning in large introductory classes.

Professional development (CPE) credit is available for interested teachers
Visitor Parking is available on the UTEP campus

Free Workshop on “Un-Covering” History

Un-Covering History”
A workshop with historian Lendol Calder

Saturday, May 26, 2012
9:00-10:30 am

Liberal Arts Building (building #8 on this map), Room 323
The University of Texas at El Paso

Come prepared: read the Journal of American History article and see the video
Print a Poster

Lendol Calder is a Professor of History at Augustana College and a leader in the growing movement to bring scholarly modes of inquiry to teaching and learning in higher education. In 1999, Calder was chosen by the Carnegie Foundation to be a Fellow at the Carnegie Academy for the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning. Calder’s research, published in the March 2006 issue of the Journal of American History, examines the problem of “coverage” in introductory courses and is part of a larger effort to forge a new “signature pedagogy” for the discipline of history. His work as a Carnegie Scholar has made him a popular speaker and presenter on topics related to historical thinking and the teaching of undergraduates.

A native of Texas, Calder is a scholar of the history of American consumerism. His 1999 book Financing the American Dream: A Cultural History of Consumer Credit was hailed by the Wall Street Journal as “deliciously seditious” for the ways it inverted common assumptions about the meaning of credit in American life. With a team of other distinguished scholars brought together by the Templeton Foundation and the Institute for the Advanced Study of American Culture at the University of Virginia, Calder is currently at work on a multidisciplinary, multi-volume analysis of the thrift ethos in American history and culture.

Parking on the UTEP campus is free and open to the public on Saturdays
Professional development (CPE) credit available for interested teachers

Relevance: Is It In Your Classroom?

Date: September 1, 2009
Time: 5:45-6:30 p.m.*
Location: Liberal Arts Building, room 322, UTEP Campus (building #14 on this map)
Presenter: Dr. Keith A. Erekson, Assistant Professor of History

Description: Students often report that history and social studies are “boring” and “irrelevant.” What is relevance? Should it be in your classroom? Who is responsible to make your class relevant? This interactive presentation unites classroom experience, popular culture, historiography, and theory to provide answers both surprising and practical.

* The presentation is part of the Center for History Teaching & Learning’s Grand Opening and will follow a the 5:00 p.m. business meeting and refreshments of the El Paso del Norte Council for the Social Studies.

Teaching Abraham Lincoln

Date: February 10, 2009
Location: Blumberg Auditorium, downstairs in the UTEP Library
Presenters: Dr. Keith A. Erekson, Martin Mota, Monet Munoz, Eric A. Robinson

Description: February 12, 2009, will mark the 200th birthday of Abraham Lincoln. Why should we celebrate? How is Lincoln relevant to El Paso residents? Why does President Obama compare himself to Lincoln? How can you bring Lincoln into your classroom? Find answers to these questions, ask your own, and earn professional development credit at a workshop led by Dr. Keith Erekson of the UTEP History Department.