Social Studies Review Session

Social Studies Review Session on Saturday, October 19th. It will be held in the Liberal Arts Building Room 222.

Students must report at 8am. They will be given an hour for lunch. It is expected to run until 5pm.

Students can RSVP at case@utep.edu.

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History Teachers Study with Experts

Fifty high school history and social studies teachers from the El Paso area and from around the state of Texas gathered at UTEP for three days of intensive training with leading scholars of American war and foreign policy. The teachers were selected from more than 500 applicants to attend this one of four sessions of the institute, titled “America at War in the Twentieth Century.”

Each morning, teachers attend dynamic lectures and presentations on topics ranging from the Spanish American War, to the turning points of World War II, to the Cuban Missile Crisis by UTEP historians Brad Cartwright, Maceo C. Dailey Jr., David Hackett and Jeffrey P. Shepherd. The institute faculty also includes George C. Herring of the University of Kentucky, Senate Historian Emeritus Richard A. Baker, and Maggie Rivas-Rodriguez and Mark Lawrence of The University of Texas at Austin.

Lectures

In the afternoons, participants join the faculty in small workshops to examine primary sources such as historic letters, maps and photographs. In this setting, teachers can ask questions, make connections, and discuss ways to engage their students in the study of history. During lunch on Tuesday, Keith Erekson shared plans for UTEP’s upcoming Centennial Celebration and outlined the “Top 6 Reasons Why Students Should Come to UTEP.” On Wednesday, Adair Margo, founder of the Tom Lea Institute, will give a lunchtime presentation on the Lea’s work as an artist-correspondent for Life Magazine in the Pacific theatre of World War II.

Workshops_02About two-thirds of the participating teachers are from the El Paso region and approximately half are UTEP alumni. “The faculty members have told me how impressed they have been by the engagement and the focused questions asked by the teacher participants,” said Dr. Eric Lupfer, Director of Grants and Education at Humanities Texas.

The summer institute is sponsored by Humanities Texas and UTEP’s Center for History Teaching & Learning. “America at War in the Twentieth Century” is made possible with funding from the State of Texas as well as from the National Endowment for the Humanities We the People initiative.

For more information about Humanities Texas, visit www.humanitiestexas.org. For information about The University of Texas at El Paso, visit www.utep.edu.

Social Studies and PPR Intensive TExES Review Sessions

The Colleges of Education and Liberal Arts at UTEP are reaching out to students to prepare them for the rigors of completing the required exams for state certification. We will be offering some intensive TExES Review (ITR) sessions and registration for the June/July dates is now open. Registration is on a first-come first-served basis, and the seats are limited, so sign up as soon as possible. Request a registration form from  David Vasquez at vasdavid@utep.edu and return it to the ARC Center, Education Room 412, along with a check or money order for $50 made payable to UTEP College of Education. The $50 cost does include lunch on both days and there may be incentives available for session participants on a case-by-case basis.

These ITR sessions are two full days on the dates listed below. Additionally, students must take a pre-test the week before the sessions on Friday, June 21st at 8am. Please open a certifyteacher.com account using our discount code (UTEP4728 and your UTEP email) if you have not already done so. This is required for the pre-test date. If you already have a certifyteacher.com license, please make sure that it is active or email them to provide you with a 30 day extension. If you have taken that particular State exam within the last 6 months, we can use those results as your pre-test. Please forward a copy of your results to David Vasquez at vasdavid@utep.edu.

June 26th :
8:00 am – 11:30 am (OLD MAIN 211)
12:30 pm – 4:00 pm (MINERS 301)

June 27th :
8:00 am – 12:00 pm (LIBERAL ARTS 108)
1:00 pm – 4:00 pm (LIBERAL ARTS 108)

Historian Discusses American Foreign Policy

Historian and former Navy serviceman Dr. George C. Herring discussed more than 200 years of American foreign policy for a packed house at UTEP on Monday night. Looking at the dramatic story of America’s emergence as a superpower, from the American Revolution to the fifty-year struggle with communism and conflicts in Afghanistan and Iraq, Herring pointed out enduring themes as well as subtle ironies. Americans have always been engaged in diplomacy and always taken a sense of destiny into the international arena. Herring pointed out both triumphs and blunders as Americans worked to secure their place in the world from the seventeenth to the twenty-first century.

Herring_01The public lecture kicked off a four-day professional development event for social studies teachers that is co-sponsored by Humanities Texas and UTEP’s Center for History Teaching & Learning. Herring is a specialist in the history of U.S. foreign relations and has received National Endowment for the Humanities, Fulbright, and Guggenheim fellowships. His book, From Colony to Superpower, was published in 2008 in Oxford University Press’s prestigious History of the United States Series and was a finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award in non-fiction.

Humanities Texas and UTEP to Hold Teacher Institute on American Wars

June 14, 2013
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
CONTACT: Michael L. Gillette at (512) 440-1991

From June 17–20, 2013, more than fifty Texas teachers will attend a professional development institute sponsored by Humanities Texas and The University of Texas at El Paso (UTEP) examining twentieth-century American wars.

The institute, titled “America at War in the Twentieth Century,” offers teachers the opportunity to work closely with leading scholars, studying American participation in World Wars I and II and the wars in Korea and Vietnam.

Each morning, participants will attend dynamic lectures and presentations. In the afternoons, they will join faculty in small workshops to examine primary sources such as historic letters, maps and photographs.

The El Paso institute faculty includes George C. Herring of the University of Kentucky, Senate Historian Emeritus Richard A. Baker, and Maggie Rivas-Rodriguez and Mark Lawrence of The University of Texas at Austin.

UTEP historians Brad Cartwright, Maceo C. Dailey Jr., David Hackett and Jeffrey P. Shepherd will also serve on the institute faculty.

Adair Margo, founder of the Tom Lea Institute, will give a lunchtime presentation on the Lea’s work as an artist-correspondent for Life Magazine in the Pacific theatre of World War II.

“Humanities Texas is dedicated to improving the quality of classroom teaching throughout the state,” said Executive Director Michael L. Gillette. “Bringing teachers together to learn from leading scholars and from each other is an effective way to enable Texas students to receive the best possible educational opportunities.”

“America at War in the Twentieth Century” is made possible with funding from the State of Texas as well as from the National Endowment for the Humanities We the People initiative.

The El Paso program is the eighty-second professional development program for Texas classroom teachers organized by Humanities Texas. It is one of four institutes taking place in June at major universities across Texas. Other host universities include The University of Texas at Austin, The University of Texas at San Antonio and the University of Houston.

Humanities Texas, the state affiliate of the National Endowment for the Humanities, sponsors programs promoting heritage, culture and education throughout the state.

For more information about Humanities Texas, visit www.humanitiestexas.org. For information about The University of Texas at El Paso, visit www.utep.edu.

# # #
1410 Rio Grande Street
Austin, Texas 78701
(512) 440-1991
www.humanitiestexas.org

Free Lecture on American Foreign Policy

Cover
U.S. Foreign Policy: From Colony to Superpower
By George C. Herring
Monday, June 17, 2013
5:30 PM
El Paso Natural Gas Conference Center, UTEP Campus

From the American Revolution to the fifty-year struggle with communism and conflicts in Afghanistan and Iraq, From Colony to Superpower tells the dramatic story of America’s emergence as superpower–its birth in revolution, its troubled present, and its uncertain future. The book was published in 2008 in Oxford University Press’s prestigious History of the United States Series. It was a finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award in non-fiction.

George C. Herring received a B.A. degree from Roanoke College and after service in the U.S. Navy earned M.A. and Ph.D. degrees from the University of Virginia. He is a specialist in the history of U.S. foreign relations and has received National Endowment for the Humanities, Fulbright, and Guggenheim fellowships. In October 2004, he was a resident at the Rockefeller Study Center in Bellagio, Italy. He has been a visiting professor at the University of Otago in New Zealand, the U.S. Military Academy at West Point, and the University of Richmond.

Parking on the UTEP campus is free and open to the public after 5:30 PM. Park in Lot S-3 on Sun Bowl Dr. Walk over the bridge. Follow the sidewalk to the conference center.

The Center for History Teaching & Learning is a division of UTEP’s History Department created to promote scholarly teaching among department faculty, support teacher education among our students, and provide outreach and professional development opportunities for area social studies teachers.

Print out your own poster.

For more information about the workshop, please visit www.utep.edu/chtl or contact Dr. Keith A. Erekson at 915-747-5878 or kaerekson@utep.edu.

UTEP History Students Will Share Research Findings on UTEP History

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:
May 2, 2013

El Paso, Texas – All UTEP history students are required to write an archive-based research paper as the final experience in the history major. During the spring 2013 semester, several students have been researching UTEP’s history as part of the University’s upcoming Centennial celebration. The student-researchers invite the interested public to attend a free information session from 5:00 to 6:00 p.m. on Wednesday, May 15, 2013, in the McNeely Room on the 6th floor of the University Library.

The students spent countless hours researching everything there is to know about the University, from the start of school to the present day. Their subjects range from the Chicano movement and its many organizations and students that made the movement successful, to the women studies and their own struggle in our school. Some students also focused on the military and its correlation to the success of this institute. Other subjects covered are the early years in the music department; as well as the relationship between the Mexican Revolution to the construction of our school.

During the reception, the student researchers will answer questions about the University’s history and will donate their papers to the University’s C. L. Sonnichsen Special Collections. Prizes will be given to the students with the best paper and to the presenter chosen by the audience in attendance.

“It has been an honor and a privilege to have studied this wonderful school,” said Christina Bretado, one of the students. “Everyone is invited! Hope to see you there!”

CONTACT:

Christina Bretado, (915)383-4420, cabretado@miners.utep.edu
Oscar Navarro, (915) 855-7081, onavarro2@miners.utep.edu

Presentation on Teaching with Passion and Purpose

“Passion, Purpose, and Performance:
Historians Talk About Their Teaching”

By Alan and Jeanne Booth

Friday, October 26, 2012, 3:00 PM
Liberal Arts Building, Room 322/323
The University of Texas at El Paso

Drawing upon interviews with nearly 250 academic historians from Europe, the US, and Australia, this presentation will examine the experiences of teaching history in higher education. The findings delve into the often-private hopes and values of history practitioners in order to foreground historians talking about why they became history teachers, what they love about teaching, what they do to engage students, and what has helped most to sustain their passion and develop their capabilities as teachers.

Alan Booth is Emeritus Professor of History at the University of Nottingham and a UK National Teaching Fellow. His books include Teaching History at University: Enhancing Learning and Understanding (2003) and The Practice of University History Teaching (2000).

Jeanne Booth leads The Good Work Guide, a multi-disciplinary consultancy working with universities and enterprises to equip people for the challenges of making a living in the 21st century. She is a trained historian and Fellow of the Royal Society of Arts, Manufactures, and Commerce who has contributed widely to the development of life-long education and career services, creative business and social enterprise support, and curriculum design in the UK.

This session of the UTEP History Department Seminar Series is sponsored by the Center for History Teaching & Learning’s History Survey Project

Education Historian to Speak at UTEP

“Controversial Issues and the Rights of Teachers:

What We Don’t Talk About in Teaching the Humanities, and Why”

Dr. Jonathan Zimmerman, New York University

Thursday, September 20, 2012

5:30 PM

University Library, Blumberg Auditorium, Room 111

The University of Texas at El Paso

Jonathan Zimmerman is Professor of Education and History at New York University. The nation’s leading scholar on the history of American schools and their relationship to political culture, Zimmerman has published numerous books, including Small Wonder: The Little Red Schoolhouse in History and Memory (Yale University Press), Innocents Abroad: American Teachers in the Twentieth Century (Harvard University Press), and Whose America? Education and the Culture Wars (Harvard University Press). His articles have been published in the History of Education Quarterly, the Journal of American History, and Teachers College Record. He is the winner of NYU’s Distinguished Teaching Award and has published editorials on education issues in the New York Times, Christian Science Monitor, the Philadelphia Inquirer, the New Republic, and the Washington Post.

This lecture is part of the UTEP Picks: Election 2012 lecture series and is made possible through the generous assistance of Humanities Texas, the UTEP Department of English, the UTEP Department of History, and UTEP’s Center for History Teaching & Learning.

Lectures and Movies for Election 2012

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