OAH Publishes Report of History Survey Project

OAHThe July 2013 issue of the Magazine of History, published by the Organization of American Historians, contains a report of the Center’s History Survey Project (HSP). The HSP brought together six scholarly teachers of introductory history courses in the El Paso region who work in varying instructional settings, from a four-year university (UTEP) to high school formats such as AP and dual credit. The result was an innovative professional-development model that combined long-term commitment with current scholarship. “The History Survey Project has taken an important first step in examining the varieties of history survey course options in the state of Texas,” the report concludes. “It has also brought the scholarship of history teaching and learning to bear on the professional development of teachers of survey courses.”

Read the report.

The History Survey Project (HSP) aims to explore, understand, and improve the teaching of U.S. history survey courses. It was supported by the Texas Faculty Collaborative for Social Studies of the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board, the Center for History Teaching & Learning at The University of Texas at El Paso, and the Department of History at The University of Texas at El Paso.

The Organization of American Historians is the largest academic membership association devoted to the study of American History. It promotes excellence in the scholarship, teaching, and presentation of American history, and encourages wide discussion of historical questions and equitable treatment of all practitioners of history. The OAH Magazine of History has been published since 1985. Each quarterly issue focuses on a theme in U.S. history. Articles draw upon recent scholarship, survey the historiography, and provide practical teaching strategies. Its goal is to enhance the teaching and presentation of U.S. history in the classroom.

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David Pace Visits UTEP

Historian David Pace recently visited UTEP to talk about “decoding” history. On the morning of Wednesday, June 13, an audience of secondary- and college-level history teachers  listened as Dr. Pace discussed the”bottlenecks” that students encounter when attempting to learn history. He introduced a procedure that teachers can employ to help their students understand the procedures and practices unique to the discipline of history.

Then, Pace met with the History Survey Project Fellows in a three-hour working session in which he provided specific feedback on the courses they are redesigning to be taught throughout El Paso during the 2012-2013 academic year.

Pace is a Professor Emeritus of History at Indiana University and a leader in the growing movement to bring scholarly modes of inquiry to teaching and learning in higher education. His visit was part of the History Survey Project, an innovative professional development program designed to produce real change in the teaching and learning of history. It is hosted by the Center for History Teaching & Learning through a generous grant from the Texas Faculty Collaborative for Social Studies of the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board.

Lendol Calder visits UTEP

Historian Lendol Calder recently visited UTEP to talk about “uncovering” history. On the morning of Saturday, May 26, a crowded room of history teachers—from both the secondary and college levels—listened as Dr. Calder discussed the crisis in history education and the harms of traditional teaching methods. He introduced the concept of “backwards design” and coached attendees through the process of identifying the ends of history instruction—the essential questions—and then building assessment and learning activities to meet them.

Then, Calder met with the History Survey Project Fellows in a three-hour working session in which he provided specific feedback on the courses they are redesigning to be taught throughout El Paso during the 2012-2013 academic year. He introduced the Fellows to a host of key teaching resources that are now listed in the HSP online bibliography.

Calder is a Professor of History at Augustana College and a leader in the growing movement to bring scholarly modes of inquiry to teaching and learning in higher education. His visit was part of the History Survey Project, an innovative professional development program designed to produce real change in the teaching and learning of history. It is hosted by the Center for History Teaching & Learning through a generous grant from the Texas Faculty Collaborative for Social Studies of the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board.

Free Workshop on “Decoding” History


In “Decoding History,” Dr. Pace will lead participants through the process he has developed to help teachers identify the “bottlenecks” that occur when key assumptions about history remain hidden in invisible disciplinary “code.” He will introduce the decoding process and share videos of faculty working to define the often unstated processes that students must master to succeed in history. After seeing examples of successful strategies for decoding history, participants will have the opportunity to reflect on what remains “untaught” in their own classrooms.

“Decoding History”
A workshop with historian David Pace

Wednesday, June 13, 2012
9:00-10:30 am

Health Sciences & Nursing Building, Room 135
(Building #255 on this map)
The University of Texas at El Paso

Come prepared: read the article and visit the History Learning Project website

David Pace, Ph.D., is a Professor Emeritus of History at Indiana University and co-author of Decoding the Disciplines: Helping Students Learn Disciplinary Ways of Thinking (2004). He is a Fellow in the Carnegie Academy for the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning and a recipient of the American Historical Association’s Eugene Asher Distinguished Teaching Award. Over the past six years he has been one of the directors of the History Learning Project, which seeks to define the kinds of operations required of students in college-level history courses and to devise effective strategies.

A native of Houston, Dr. Pace specializes in modern European and cultural history and has authored scholarly studies on influential French anthropologist Claude Lévi-Strauss and on French reactions to the atomic bomb and nuclear energy. He has also developed a number of innovative history courses, including one on “Visions of the Future” and one on “Paris and Berlin in the 1920s” (a version of which he taught in Paris). For more than a decade he served as co-director of Indiana University’s Freshman Learning Project, a program that helps faculty across campus develop new ways of overcoming bottlenecks in to learning in large introductory classes.

Professional development (CPE) credit is available for interested teachers
Visitor Parking is available on the UTEP campus

Free Workshop on “Un-Covering” History

Un-Covering History”
A workshop with historian Lendol Calder

Saturday, May 26, 2012
9:00-10:30 am

Liberal Arts Building (building #8 on this map), Room 323
The University of Texas at El Paso

Come prepared: read the Journal of American History article and see the video
Print a Poster

Lendol Calder is a Professor of History at Augustana College and a leader in the growing movement to bring scholarly modes of inquiry to teaching and learning in higher education. In 1999, Calder was chosen by the Carnegie Foundation to be a Fellow at the Carnegie Academy for the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning. Calder’s research, published in the March 2006 issue of the Journal of American History, examines the problem of “coverage” in introductory courses and is part of a larger effort to forge a new “signature pedagogy” for the discipline of history. His work as a Carnegie Scholar has made him a popular speaker and presenter on topics related to historical thinking and the teaching of undergraduates.

A native of Texas, Calder is a scholar of the history of American consumerism. His 1999 book Financing the American Dream: A Cultural History of Consumer Credit was hailed by the Wall Street Journal as “deliciously seditious” for the ways it inverted common assumptions about the meaning of credit in American life. With a team of other distinguished scholars brought together by the Templeton Foundation and the Institute for the Advanced Study of American Culture at the University of Virginia, Calder is currently at work on a multidisciplinary, multi-volume analysis of the thrift ethos in American history and culture.

Parking on the UTEP campus is free and open to the public on Saturdays
Professional development (CPE) credit available for interested teachers

Announcing the History Survey Project Fellows 2012-2013

FOR IMMEADIATE RELEASE

January 19, 2012

Announcing the History Survey Project Fellows 2012-2013

El Paso, Texas – The History Survey Project is pleased to announce the selection of the inaugural group of fellows for 2012-2013. Fellows were selected from a group of top local educators through a rigorous selection process and are making an eighteen-month commitment to participate in a world-class professional development experience that will improve classroom teaching.

The accepted fellows come from across El Paso and from a variety of United States History teaching environments. Martina Collins teaches at Northwest Early College High School in the Canutillo Independent School District. Eduardo Hinojos is a teacher at Socorro High School in the Socorro Independent School District where he is the CATE teacher for the Governance and Public Administration Cluster and Director for the EXCEL Academy. Michael Reese teaches at Andress High School in the El Paso Independent School District and teaches Advanced Placement® classes. Hazel Tipton is a dual credit teacher at Austin High School in the El Paso Independent School District.

The History Survey Project (HSP) aims to explore, understand, and improve the teaching of U.S. history survey courses by uniting practical experience with recent findings from the scholarship of teaching and learning. The selected fellows will receive intellectual and financial support to revise their survey courses, producing a variety of instructional materials along the way. These instructional materials will be able to be used by all faculty who simultaneously survey the past and prepare Americans for the future. The project will also bring several internationally-renowned scholars on history teaching to El Paso to instruct participants, including Dr. Lendol Calder (Augustana College), Dr. David Pace (Indiana University), and Dr. Alan Booth (University of Nottingham.

The History Survey Project is co-directed by UTEP professors Bradley J. Cartwright and Keith A. Erekson. It is a joint collaboration between the University of Texas at El Paso’s Center for History Teaching & Learning, the Department of History, and the Texas Faculty Collaborative for Social Studies of the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board. The collaborative is directed by Dr. Andrew Milson of the University of Texas at Arlington and is an initiative of the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board. The Center for History Teaching & Learning is a division of UTEP’s History Department created to promote scholarly teaching among department faculty, support teacher education among our students, and provide outreach and professional development opportunities for area social studies teachers.

For more information, please visit utep.edu/hsp, send an email to hsp@utep.edu, or call 915-747-5878.

LINKS

History Survey Project website

www.utep.edu/hsp

Center for History Teaching & Learning

http://www.utep.edu/chtl


Announcing the History Survey Project

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
November 29, 2011

El Paso, Texas – The Center for History Teaching & Learning is pleased to announce the History Survey Project. The History Survey Project (HSP) aims to explore, understand, and improve the teaching of U.S. history survey courses by uniting practical experience with recent findings from the scholarship of teaching and learning. Over the course of 18 months, selected El Paso-area history teachers will receive intellectual and financial support to revise their survey courses, producing a variety of instructional materials along the way. The project will also bring several internationally-renowned scholars on history teaching to El Paso to instruct participants. Teachers of college-level U.S. history courses (including AP, dual credit, and early college) are invited to apply.

In the state of Texas, all college students are required to complete six hours of U.S. history coursework and these “survey” courses serve as the primary training for future high school teachers. Unfortunately, survey courses vary widely in scope and quality. In the first place, they are taught in five different institutional settings: universities, community colleges, early college high schools, dual credit classrooms, and AP history classes. Additional variation derives from the fact that the courses are also taught in face-to-face, online, and hybrid instructional venues. Furthermore, there is virtually no coordination across the different settings and venues in regards to such crucial elements as course design, student expectations, teacher training, or instructional methods. Accordingly, a national survey found that most Americans described their history classes as “boring” or “irrelevant.” The History Survey Project (HSP) will produce instructional materials that can be used by all faculty who simultaneously survey the past and prepare Americans for the future.

The History Survey Project is funded by a generous grant from the Texas Faculty Collaborative for Social Studies.  The collaborative is directed by Dr. Andrew Milson of the University of Texas at Arlington and is an initiative of the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board. HSP is co-directed by UTEP professors Bradley J. Cartwright and Keith A. Erekson and supported by the Center for History Teaching & Learning. The Center for History Teaching & Learning is a division of UTEP’s History Department created to promote scholarly teaching among department faculty, support teacher education among our students, and provide outreach and professional development opportunities for area social studies teachers.

For more information, please visit utep.edu/hsp, send an email to chtl@utep.edu, or call 915-747-5878.

LINKS

History Survey Project website
www.utep.edu/hsp

Application for HSP Fellows
http://research.utep.edu/Default.aspx?tabid=70413

Center for History Teaching & Learning
www.utep.edu/chtl